You cannot

life, writing
Edited version of a painting of a dream: plugged volcanoes with a cresting wave beyond them, poised to fall.

Edited version of a painting of a dream.

End a life, end a world.

Replace the irreplaceable eye, the singular perspective, the experience of
loving joyful bored stalwart fearful brave angry mean kind hateful cool excited passionate
people breaths blinks touches hands grasping music-hearing whispering shouting standing
filled with skies words inmost dreams sensuous interactions and each other’s ideas and the patterns only we see,
replace all that I
with—nothing.

Negative space makes a space, filled by vacuum-abhorring nature with
the attention of more
Worlds.

worlds, not
units in Venn diagrams
tagged by our characteristics, falling into slots as
predictive analysis charts soulless identity probabilities,
pitting us against each other, pitting us against ourselves, because
we are many-layered and our tags are not reasonable, they are us,

each not a unit in a mob of units with concentric permission levels but

a world entire, interacting and seeing and regarding and thinking and reacting and caring,
the appetitive psychosomatic unity a universe entire,
bumping up against and overlapping the worlds around us.

You cannot choke a world
You cannot chase and shotgun a world
You cannot kneel on a world

Without rousing the world of worlds against you.

Save a life, save a world.

 


Originally posted on Medium.com on May 31, 2020. Black lives matter.

Evangelical conservatism vs. Christ, an example

career, life

There’s been a lot of coverage recently about the oxymoronic support by evangelical Christians of the current US president, whose actions do not seem to promote Christ in any way. At the same time, many other Christians vehemently oppose that same president. People on the outside might very well be confused.

I don’t want to add to the current debate, but I do want to share an example that might help differentiate between evangelical conservatism and what I would call a more Christ-based approach. Below is an updated version of a 2003 post about the ordination of a gay bishop. In it, I argue that support of the ordination of a gay bishop in the ECUSA (Episcopal Church of the USA) was the more Christian approach, as opposed to the culture-based, anti-LGBTQ evangelical outlook.